A selection of summertime plumbing problems you need to be wary of

Summertime plumbing blues image by Itsajoop (via Shutterstock).

Don’t get caught out this summer: sprinkler problems and clogged cisterns can happen at any time of the year, but summer could also mean smelly sewers. Image by Itsajoop (via Shutterstock).

There is never a good time for plumbing based mishaps. In the winter, frozen pipes could lead to leakage whereas summertime blockages could leave an unpleasant smell in your toilets. They can strike at any time, whether the tarmac’s melting or freezing by Swinton Civic Centre.

In this helpful little post, here’s a selection of possible plumbing problems you need to be aware of in this time of year.

1. Stuck sprinkler nozzles and leaky pipes

After months without continuous use, your sprinkler system might not be in tip top form. There could be little holes in the hose pipe which impairs its ability to function properly. Sprinkler heads could be affected by lawn mowing in winter times.

2. Blocked toilets

There is nothing worse than a blocked toilet any time of the year but summertime, more than the other three seasons is pretty… erm, bad. If you’re inviting friends around, or run a public building that sees heavy use in the summertime (i.e., a pub, leisure centre, or public toilets), your lavatories could get a serious hammering. Please take heed of, and remind your customers of the PPP (poo, paper, pee) rule.

3. Clogged waste disposal units

If your kitchen or canteen sink has a waste disposal units, make sure you dispose of bones, fruit stones and pips, corn cobs, and melon rind separately. Though some models of sink waste disposal unit allow you to dispose of bones, check before you can.

4. Slow clearing shower drains

Whether you have a shower at home, or you are familiar with the showers at your local gymnasium, a full or overflowing tray is the last thing you want. If you get a lot of sand or pebbles in your shower tray, this can clog up the drain.

ST Heating Services, 21 July 2017.

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